Saturday, April 12, 2014

Ancestry Saturday: An Ancestors Ancestor?








It's my fourth trip to Price Cemetery near Richwood in Union County, Ohio. Next to my kids' fourth great grandfather Isaac Daniels is a mystery.

The top has been chopped off where the name used to be on this stone. Erosion requires chalk to be even partially readable.

The proximity and the similarity of stone design to the Isaac Daniels stone adjacent to the South implies it's a relative.

I read it to show the person dying in 1877, four years after Isaac. Further, I read aged 87, implying this person is 20 years older than Isaac.

Could this be an ancestor to Isaac? Isaac's parents are unknown to me.  Could this be one of them?  No answers yet.

Saturday, April 5, 2014

Ancestry Saturday: Teacher-Pupil Cousins


A recent, interesting find was my Great Grandfather Royal Platt's first cousins Minnie and Lizzie.  This copy of an article from 1906 made a history book on the town of Bloomdale, Ohio.

What's interesting is that Lizzie, born in 1883, was teacher to Minnie, her sister, born in 1897.
Minnie

Lizzie (aka Betty)
Both were part of a previously unknown part of my family.  Now, thanks to a third cousin and thanks to a history book, I have photos.

Saturday, March 29, 2014

Ancestry Saturday: Up The Hill Again


Downing Cemetery in Magnolia, Ohio is an interesting little place.  It got my attention again.

Last fall, I visited to try to find a great grand uncle who was a Revolutionary War patriot and an early settler of Stark County, my home county.  I found his stone in disarray.

I later found an early 1970's photo that showed what the stone used to look like.  It was a lesson in why to keep looking.  It also gave me a reason to want to go back.  So, I did.

My kids and I made a trek back when we were running early to a family gathering.

This trek back found that his daughter Drusilla's stone is, indeed, intact. 


I photographed the entire cemetery (it took less than 10 minutes) and loaded it up to Findagrave.com.  There are several unreadable stones, but only three of the 25 stones in an earlier transcription have been photographically documented now.